Follow us on: 

UN launches new policy discussion paper to help Viet Nam respond to climate change

Print Email

Simon Maxwell,  former director of the Overseas Development InstituteHa Noi, 2 December 2009 - What are the main climate change challenges facing Viet Nam? What policies are needed to ensure that Viet Nam continues on a path of sustainable human development?  These are the main questions addressed in Viet Nam and Climate Change: A discussion paper on policies for sustainable human development which was launched today at a national climate change dialogue organized by the United Nations, the Viet Nam Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment and Oxfam.

The paper highlights the main climate change challenges faced by Viet Nam and makes a series of recommendations for how national policies and practices should be strengthened.  It argues that while Viet Nam is one of the countries most affected by climate change, major climate action is possible and that can bring many opportunities for further development. These benefits extend well beyond just averting the dangers of the adverse effects of climate change: Viet Nam could benefit from new international financing for adaptation and mitigation, adoption of more efficient, cleaner technologies, and gender equality could be improved through empowering women in local and national decision-making related to climate change. 
Image of  participant making comments at the climate change dialogueTwo related research papers, Responding to Climate Change in Viet Nam: Opportunities for improving gender equality, prepared in collaboration with Oxfam and national partners, and Building Resilience: adaptive strategies for coastal livelihoods most at risk to climate change impacts in Central Viet Nam were also presented and discussed at the event this morning. A range of issues were discussed by participants, including the challenge of coordination of climate change responses, the need for market-based mechanisms for adaptation and mitigation, the different (often more severe) impacts on women of climate change effects, and how to best Viet Nam to absorb the expected increase in financing for adaptation and mitigation.

Click below to download papers from today’s policy discussion:

You can also participate in an online discussion about issues raised at today's event - initiated by Le Giang Lam, the WWViews Vietnam representative at COP15 - by clicking here.



The Secretary-General's message on The International Day of Older Persons


1 October 2015 - On the 25th anniversary of the International Day of Older Persons, we recognize that older persons are an enormous asset to society and make a significant contribution to global development.

On September 25 at United Nations Headquarters in New York, Heads of State and governments committed themselves to building a sustainable world where no one, regardless of their age or gender, is left behind. In implementing the newly adopted 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, we must account for the demographic changes of the next 15 years. These will have a direct bearing on the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.


Remarks by the Secretary-General at summit for the adoption of the Post-2015 Development Agenda


New York, 25 September 2015

Esteemed co-Chairs of this post-2015 Summit,
Mr. President of the General Assembly,
Distinguished Heads of State and Government,
Distinguished guests,
Ladies and Gentlemen,

We have reached a defining moment in human history.

The people of the world have asked us to shine a light on a future of promise and opportunity.

Member States have responded with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

The new agenda is a promise by leaders to all people everywhere.

It is a universal, integrated and transformative vision for a better world.

It is an agenda for people, to end poverty in all its forms.

An agenda for the planet, our common home.

An agenda for shared prosperity, peace and partnership.

It conveys the urgency of climate action.

It is rooted in gender equality and respect for the rights of all.

Above all, it pledges to leave no one behind.  


The Secretary-General's message on The International Day of Peace 2015


21 September 2015 - This year's International Day of Peace comes at a time of deadly violence and destabilizing conflicts around the world. Rather than succumbing to despair, we have a collective responsibility to demand an end to the brutality and impunity that prevail.

I call on all warring parties to lay down their weapons and observe a global ceasefire. To them I say: stop the killings and the destruction, and create space for lasting peace.

Although it may seem hopelessly distant, the dream of peace pulses in the lives of people everywhere.


The Secretary-General’s Message on the International Day For the preservation of the Ozone layer

16 September 2015 - Not so long ago, humanity stood on the brink of a self-inflicted catastrophe. Our use of ozone-depleting substances such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) had torn a hole in the ozone layer that protects us from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation.

But we tackled this challenge. Thirty years ago, the international community signed the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer. Under its Montreal Protocol, the world united to slash the production and consumption of CFCs and other ozone-depleting substances.


The Secretary-General's Message on the International Day of Democracy


15 September 2015 - Civil society is the oxygen of democracy.

We see this clearly in the world’s most vibrant and stable democracies, where Government and civil society work together for common goals. Civil society acts as a catalyst for social progress and economic growth.  It plays a critical role in keeping Government accountable, and helps represent the diverse interests of the population, including its most vulnerable groups.