Follow us on: 
facebook
youtube
flick
 

One Plan 2006 - 2010

Print Email

oneunsigning_03The One Plan seeks to combine and synthesize the work of the 14 resident UN organizations in Viet Nam – namely FAO, IFAD, ILO, UNAIDS, UNDP, UNFPA, UN-HABITAT, UNIDO, UNESCO, UNICEF, UNIFEM, UNODC, UNV and WHO – within a single planning framework to better support the Socio-Economic Development Plan (2006-2010) of Viet Nam and the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. The One Plan brings greater programmatic coherence, greater synergies and helps the UN respond better to key national priorities. It presents the development challenges, the programme outcomes, outputs and expected results, implementing strategies, management responsibilities, and commitments of the Government and the participating UN Organizations.(Click here to download the One Plan for 2006-2010)

Since the signing of the (revised) One Plan in June 2008, the UNCT has moved forward on implementation, monitoring and resourcing. To put the One Plan into action, a One Plan Management Plan (OPMP) has been finalized and agreed upon by all participating agencies. The OPMP has been established to outline how the UN Organizations participating in the One UN Initiative in Viet Nam will organize themselves in the most effective way so as to successfully implement the One Plan and other key elements of the "One UN Initiative".

Under the OPMP, Programme Coordination Groups (PCGs) have been established as an effective and inclusive mechanism for UN Agencies to work together with each other and with partners on key shared issues such as HIV and AIDS, social and development policies, education and governance. The PCGs, will, among other things, coordinate the implementation of a specific set of outputs from the One Plan. The OPMP also stresses the use of common services as another way of doing things better, and more cheaply. Common services are joint operational arrangements, in areas like travel and accommodation services, banking, security, administrative and financial procedures, procurement, recruitment, joint training and IT support.

Also, in order to better align and harmonize the UN’s planning with Viet Nam’s national development plan for 2011-2015, the UN requested an extension of the current One Plan by one year – through 2011. On 25 August 2009, the extension year was approved in principle by MPI Vice Minister Sinh and on 28 September, the UNDG Asia-Pacific team also approved the request.

Spotlight

tom_event_390.jpg

72 hours to make the world better for children with disabilities

TOM (Tikkun Olam Makers) is an international non-profit organization using design and technology to address neglected problems. The TOM event is an intersection between challenges and technical solutions. Participants with different backgrounds and expertise gather together for a 72-hour “makeathon” and build a product to help someone in need. TOM focuses on inclusive designs with a reasonable price for people with disabilities. In Hebrew, Tikkun Olam means changing the world; and this is TOM’s mission. (See more information about TOM at www.tomglobal.org) Dead

In 2016, the United States Consulate General in Ho Chi Minh City, the Embassy of the State of Israel, UNICEF, Disability Research and Capacity Development (DRD), FABLAB Saigon, and other partners from academia and the private sector will co-organize the TOM event in Ho Chi Minh City. This is a unique opportunity for children with disabilities and families to present their challenges, as well as share ideas of products that would help to reduce their challenges. Based on these ideas, technical teams will develop innovative solutions during a 72-hour “makeathon” to help children have a better life.


ban-ki-moon.jpg

The Secretary-General’s message on Human Rights Day

 

10 December 2015 - Amid large-scale atrocities and widespread abuses across the world, Human Rights Day should rally more concerted global action to promote the timeless principles that we have collectively pledged to uphold.

In a year that marks the 70th anniversary of the United Nations, we can draw inspiration from the history of the modern human rights movement, which emerged from the Second World War.

At that time, President Franklin D. Roosevelt of the United States identified four basic freedoms as the birthright of all people: freedom of expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want and freedom from fear.  His wife, Eleanor Roosevelt, joined forces at the United Nations with human rights champions from around the world to enshrine these freedoms in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.


ban-ki-moon.jpg

The Secretary-General’s message on International Anti-corruption Day

 

9 December 2015 - Global attitudes towards corruption have changed dramatically.  Where once bribery, corruption and illicit financial flows were often considered part of the cost of doing business, today corruption is widely -- and rightly -- understood as criminal and corrosive. The new 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, our plan to end poverty and ensure lives of dignity for all, recognizes the need to fight corruption in all its aspects and calls for significant reductions in illicit financial flows as well as for the recovery of stolen assets.

Corruption has disastrous impacts on development when funds that should be devoted to schools, health clinics and other vital public services are instead diverted into the hands of criminals or dishonest officials.


ban-ki-moon.jpg

The Secretary-General’s message on World AIDS Day

 

1 December 2015 - This year, we mark World AIDS Day with new hope. I applaud the staunch advocacy of activists. I commend the persistent efforts of health workers. And I pay tribute to the principled stance of human rights defenders and the courage of all those who have joined forces to fight for global progress against the disease.

World leaders have unanimously committed to ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 as part of the Sustainable Development Goals adopted in September. This commitment reflects the power of solidarity to forge, from a destructive disease, one of the most inclusive movements in modern history.


ban-ki-moon.jpg

The Secretary-General’s message on the International Day For The Elimination of Violence Against Women

 

25 November 2015 - The atrocity crimes being committed against women and girls in conflict zones, along with the domestic abuse found in all countries, are grave threats to progress.

I am deeply concerned about the plight of women and girls living in conditions of armed conflict, who suffer various forms of violence, sexual assault, sexual slavery and trafficking. Violent extremists are perverting religious teachings to justify the mass subjugation and abuse of women. These are not random acts of violence, or the incidental fallout of war, but rather systematic efforts to deny women's freedoms and control their bodies. As the world strives to counter and prevent violence extremism, the protection and empowerment of women and girls must be a key consideration.