Follow us on: 
facebook
youtube
flick
 

Documents

Order by : Name | Date | Hits [ Ascendant ]

Study on the correnlation between household environmental, household water supply, mothers' hygine behavior for children under 5 and the of child nutrition in Viet Nam

Date added: 03/20/2012
Downloads: 13910
Study on the correnlation between household environmental, household water supply, mothers' hygine behavior for children under 5 and the of child nutrition in Viet Nam

The great achievements of Vietnam in reducing the rate of malnutrition in children were recorded in the National Malnutrition Prevention and Control Program. In 1994, the rate of malnutrition in children under 5 accounted for 45%, and that in 2008 was reduced to 19.9%. UNICEF considered this result impressive, and Vietnam was the country in which the child malnutrition rate was reduced most rapidly in the Asian – Pacific region.

The National Strategy for Nutrition for 2001-2010 was approved with comprehensive aspects for improving child nutritional status. One of the interventions of the National Malnutrition Prevention and Control Program is to apply environmental sanitation, use clean water sources, and ensure routine de-worming, and practice hand-washing before eating, after urinating and defecating. However, up to present, the studies on the relation between the malnutrition of children under 5 and environmental sanitation, clean water sources, and
knowledge and practice of mothers on personal hygiene have been insufficient in both quantity and quality. Even in the 2010 General Nutrition Survey, the focus was to study the relation between the factors of breast-feeding, feeding children and the malnutrition of children. The relation between the situation of daily-living water supply, household latrines, KAP on personal hygiene of mothers and the malnutrition of children was not mentioned. Therefore, this study was selected by UNICEF and MOH.

Social health insurance as a means to achieving universal coverage and more equitable health outcome

Date added: 01/04/2012
Downloads: 13442
Social health insurance as a means to achieving universal coverage and more equitable health outcome

This technical assessment was aimed at reviewing the implementation of the Health Insurance Law in Viet Nam with focus on marginalized groups including children under six, the poor and the near-poor and ethnic minority groups.

 

Overall, Viet Nam has made considerable progress in improving economic and social well-being such as reducing the absolute poverty rate and attaining rapid and sustained economic growth. Epidemiologically, Viet Nam has been experiencing a transition to that of a developing country with an increased prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Financially, key expenditures on health have been increasing. Specifically, total health expenditure as a percentage share of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) increased slightly from 4.9% in 1998 to 6.4% in 2008, mainly as a result of increases in government and social security expenditures on health. The poor and children under six have been considered vulnerable groups in health financing policies in general, and in health insurance, in particular.

Evaluation of Child Injury Prevention Interventions in Viet Nam

Date added: 11/30/2011
Downloads: 13152
Evaluation of Child Injury Prevention Interventions in Viet Nam

Child injuries remain a growing public health problem and injuries are now acknowledged as one of the leading contributors to the global burden of disease. The evidence suggests that the burden of injury on children is unequal, with the greatest burden amongst the poor and in developing and middle income countries, compared with high income countries. These countries are where most of the world’s children live. In these countries children are exposed to considerable risk from hazards in all environments.

Child Poverty in East Asia and the Pacific: Deprivations and Disparities - A Study of Seven Countrie

Date added: 11/30/2011
Downloads: 14514
Child Poverty in East Asia and the Pacific: Deprivations and Disparities - A Study of Seven Countrie

Poverty reduction begins with children. A child’s experience of poverty is very different from that of an adult. Income is but one dimension among many that should be assessed when analyzing child poverty and disparity. Non-monetary deprivation in dimensions such as shelter, food, water, sanitation, education, health, and information is equally, if not more, revealing. Since deprivation along these dimensions can have significant negative consequences on a child’s development and future, an examination of multidimensional child poverty and associated disparities is clearly warranted.

As part of UNICEF’s Global Study on Child Poverty and Disparities, several countries in East Asia and the Pacific have undertaken national child poverty and disparity studies. In this paper, results from seven of those countries, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Mongolia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vanuatu and Viet Nam, are reviewed. The objective is to identify trends and lessons, generate strategies for UNICEF EAPRO, and to contribute toward a richer conceptualization of the situation of children in the region.

Related Links:

Downloads:

Making Social Audit work for Viet Nam: Key Findings and Lessons Learned from a Pilot of Four Social

Date added: 11/22/2011
Downloads: 15928
Making Social Audit work for Viet Nam: Key Findings and Lessons Learned from a Pilot of Four Social

A pilot involving four social audit tools was implemented in Viet Nam in 2010. Led by the Ministry of Planning and Investment (MPI), and supported by UNICEF, it aimed at building capacity for the social audit of the Socio-Economic Development Plan (SEDP) to enhance the its social performance, as expressed in its ability to deliver continued improvement in the living standards of Viet Nam’s population in general and of vulnerable groups in particular. This focus was on achieving this through improved Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) of social dimensions of the 2006-2010 SEDP, particularly focusing on poverty reduction, health services for children under six years old, and gender.

The Central Institute for Economic Management (CIEM), under the authority of MPI, implemented the pilots with technical support of the UK-based Overseas Development Institute (ODI). CIEM also conducted a capacity assessment of government staff in using participatory methods for planning, monitoring and evaluation. Based on this and the lessons learned from the social audit pilots, a capacity development strategy has been developed. ODI has also developed a SEDP Social Audit Toolkit with detailed information on the four tools, based on the experience gained from piloting the tools in the Vietnamese context.

This report should be of interest to national and sub-national government officials in Viet Nam who are in charge of designing, implementing, monitoring and evaluating public policies, programs and services. It should also be of interest to UNICEF and other multilateral and donor agencies that assist the government of Viet Nam in meeting its development objectives, and interested in methods/tools that allow for greater participation of citizens in assessing public policies and programs.

Page 8 of 15

Spotlight

myhealth-myright_en.pdf.png

WORLD AIDS DAY MESSAGE 2017

1 December 2017

Michel Sidibé
Executive Director of UNAIDS
Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations

This World AIDS Day, we are highlighting the importance of the right to health and the challenges that people living with and affected by HIV face in fulfilling that right.


contest_680.jpg

Community spaces design contest for an exciting hanoi

Ha Noi, October 17/10/2017 - Aiming at improving the living environment and bringing culture and art to the community towards a better urban future, United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) successfully developed the project “Promote participatory, community-based and youth-led approach in safe, greening public spaces in Hoan Kiem district toward a pro-poor, inclusive and sustainable urban development” (hereinafter called Public Spaces project) under the Block by Block program with Mojang, the makers of the videogame Minecraft.

 

Deadline for round 1: From 17/10/2017 to 04/11/2017 Extended to 9 November 2017


op-ed-juv-justice-390.jpg

Harsh punishment for child offenders doesn’t prevent further criminality

The age at which a child, can be held criminally liable is a controversial issue around the world. Within Viet Nam, this issue is currently being grappled with in the Penal Code amendments. Some argue that a "get tough on crime" approach is necessary to punish children to prevent further criminality.

However, international research shows that because of their developmental stages, labelling and treating children as criminals at an early age can have serious negative impacts on their development and successful rehabilitation.


rc_ai_new_year_card_300.jpg

New Year Greetings from the United Nations Resident Coordinator a.i. in Viet Nam

 

On the occasion of New Year 2017, on behalf of the United Nations family in Viet Nam I wish to reiterate our appreciation and express our warmest wishes to our partners and friends throughout the country. We wish our partners and their families in Viet Nam peace, prosperity, good health and happiness in the coming year.

As we enter the second year of the Sustainable Development Goals era, we look forward to continuing our close cooperation for the sake of Viet Nam’s future development; one which is inclusive, equitable and sustainable, with no one left behind.

Youssouf Abdel-Jelil
United Nations Resident Coordinator a.i. in Viet Nam


WAD2016.jpg

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s message for World AIDS Day, observed on 1 December

 

Thirty-five years since the emergence of AIDS, the international community can look back with some pride.  But we must also look ahead with resolve and commitment to reach our goal of ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030.

There has been real progress in tackling the disease. More people than ever are on treatment.  Since 2010, the number of children infected through mother to child transmission has dropped by half. Fewer people die of AIDS related causes each year.  And people living with HIV are living longer lives.

The number of people with access to life-saving medicines has doubled over the past five years, now topping 18 million. With the right investments, the world can get on the fast-track to achieve our target of 30 million people on treatment by 2030.  Access to HIV medicines to prevent mother to child transmission is now available to more than 75 per cent of those in need.



RSS Email Subscription

Enter your email address: